Brewing process – Lang Creek Brewery http://langcreekbrewery.com/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 18:34:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://langcreekbrewery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png Brewing process – Lang Creek Brewery http://langcreekbrewery.com/ 32 32 Basis established for a sustainable brewing process: From next year all new Steinecker brewhouses will be EquiTherm ready https://langcreekbrewery.com/basis-established-for-a-sustainable-brewing-process-from-next-year-all-new-steinecker-brewhouses-will-be-equitherm-ready/ Wed, 10 Nov 2021 09:45:12 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/basis-established-for-a-sustainable-brewing-process-from-next-year-all-new-steinecker-brewhouses-will-be-equitherm-ready/ Steinecker, the brewing technology expert at the Krones Group, has worked to ensure that the EquiTherm energy recovery system integrates directly or can be easily retrofitted in all of its new brewhouses from early 2022. It has been ten years since Steinecker launched the EquiTherm energy recovery system, which is now used worldwide to sustainably […]]]>

Steinecker, the brewing technology expert at the Krones Group, has worked to ensure that the EquiTherm energy recovery system integrates directly or can be easily retrofitted in all of its new brewhouses from early 2022.

It has been ten years since Steinecker launched the EquiTherm energy recovery system, which is now used worldwide to sustainably produce around 65 million hectoliters of beer per year. The enormous popularity of EquiTherm is not surprising: by recovering excess energy from the hot wort, the primary energy demand is eliminated during the brewing process. This reduces the amount of energy required and improves the CO2 footprint in the brewing process: as a result, the consumption of thermal and electrical energy in the brewhouse can be reduced by up to 55% and 40%. respectively.

Breweries can also integrate the EquiTherm system into their existing brewhouses, whether or not the brewing equipment has been supplied by Steinecker. However, some effort is required for this: Necessary activities often include replacing sections that are not capable of running such a highly efficient recovery system.

New Steinecker brewhouses ready for EquiTherm as standard

The modernization of EquiTherm will be much easier in the future: given that all new Steinecker breweries purchased from 2022 will already be equipped for the EquiTherm system, which means that it should be relatively easy to modernize them without having to to actively select this option.

In other words, mash kettles, for example, will also come standard with energy recirculating hot water heating surfaces at the bottom, although they do not necessarily have to work with hot water. from the start. However, they will be able to provide the necessary efficiency to work with recovered low temperature hot water instead of steam as a heating medium in the future. Other components of the installation have also been designed for use with the energy recovery system. Basically, EquiTherm paves the way for low temperature brewing and therefore the Steinecker Brewnomic concept, which aims for climate neutrality.

CombiCube also equipped accordingly

All new breweries equipped with Steinecker equipment sold from 2022 will come with this new standard – so not only those that opt ​​for a conventional brewhouse with brew sizes above 130 hectoliters, but also all those that produce smaller volumes and therefore rely on the compact CombiCube system. The modular brewery concept is suitable for cold wort volumes of 25 to 130 hectoliters per brew and is ideally suited to the needs of craft brewers and microbreweries – because sustainability also plays a key role for this target group during the brewing process.

Learn more about the energy recovery system, its history and the benefits for the brewing process in the online magazine Krones.


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The future GEA ‘Brewery 4.0’ brewing process https://langcreekbrewery.com/the-future-gea-brewery-4-0-brewing-process/ Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/the-future-gea-brewery-4-0-brewing-process/ This will result in continuous processing and separation of the mash in double decanters, a faster fermentation and maturation process and quality assurance with just-in-time production and digitization. “Continuous brewery” Although the process is unusual for European consumers, it is a standard process in other parts of the world: beer in Asia, Africa and South […]]]>

This will result in continuous processing and separation of the mash in double decanters, a faster fermentation and maturation process and quality assurance with just-in-time production and digitization.

“Continuous brewery”

Although the process is unusual for European consumers, it is a standard process in other parts of the world: beer in Asia, Africa and South America is brewed from rice, corn and sorghum or starchy root vegetables such as cassava or cassava.

As part of its “Brewery 4.0”, GEA says it wants to help customers stay competitive in the years to come and generate flexibility throughout the supply chain.

She is currently working on the concept of a “continuous brewery” where brand changes are possible.

Dr Rudolf Michel, Head of Development, Beverage and Beer Production, GEA, told BeverageDaily that the Brewery 4.0 concept expects fermentation and maturation to accelerate even more in the future.

Processing times of four days or less can already be achieved using continuous fermentation“, did he declare.

Digitization

In breweries of various brands, conventional fermentation and maturation in vats should also be possible with significantly shorter occupancy times without any loss of quality thanks to suitable processing techniques and yeast strains..

In this case, however, the most important beer quality sensors – the brewer’s nose and palate – would no longer be sufficient. Much more measurement technology and laboratory evaluations should be planned

As part of an ongoing development project, GEA is developing a method for handling big data as part of Brewery 4.0 throughout the supply chain, from raw materials for mash brewing to final product and just in time delivery.


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Queen Máxima visits a beer brewery in Limburg and experiences the brewing process – Royal Central https://langcreekbrewery.com/queen-maxima-visits-a-beer-brewery-in-limburg-and-experiences-the-brewing-process-royal-central/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/queen-maxima-visits-a-beer-brewery-in-limburg-and-experiences-the-brewing-process-royal-central/ On Thursday, Queen Máxima of the Netherlands visited the Gulpener brewery in Limburg, where she was able to experience first-hand what it is like to work in the industry. Her Majesty was able to experience the entire job, from picking the beer ingredients in the field (such as hops, wheat, rye and barley) to the […]]]>

On Thursday, Queen Máxima of the Netherlands visited the Gulpener brewery in Limburg, where she was able to experience first-hand what it is like to work in the industry.

Her Majesty was able to experience the entire job, from picking the beer ingredients in the field (such as hops, wheat, rye and barley) to the fermentation process.

Throughout her experience, the queen was accompanied by the director of Gulpener Bierbrouwerij (or “beer brewery” in English) Jan-Paul Rutten.

The visit was made because the facility won the 2020 Sustainable Entrepreneurship Award from the King Willem I Foundation, of which Her Majesty is the patron.

During the facility tour she received, Queen Máxima discussed the company’s innovative approach to sustainability both in its brewing process and in sourcing its raw materials. , which, according to the director, are preferred by local farmers and are paid at fair prices.

But Her Majesty was also listening to a much more heart-wrenching reality, as Director Rutten laid on the table data showing the devastating toll of the company’s global shutdown. Since the Gulpener Brewery mainly serves the catering industry, when bars and restaurants had to close their turnover fell sharply, causing Gulpener two consecutive years of financial losses.

Not only was the pandemic that hit them, but the brewery was also in the middle of one of the areas most affected by the floods that hit the Netherlands earlier this year.

On that note, director Rutten acknowledged that Queen Máxima’s visit should have taken place before but that flooding prevented the event from happening. However, he took the opportunity to thank Her Majesty for her visit and said that this visit and the award are “the crown jewel of our work” and that, despite all adversities, the Queen’s visit should be a time of celebration.


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Camden Hells Lager Launches Beer ‘Recall’ to Inform About Its Brewing Process | New https://langcreekbrewery.com/camden-hells-lager-launches-beer-recall-to-inform-about-its-brewing-process-new/ Mon, 24 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/camden-hells-lager-launches-beer-recall-to-inform-about-its-brewing-process-new/ Camden Town Brewery launched “the world’s first” positive beer recall to educate consumers on its brewing process, he said. Consumers who manage to find any of the 50 “inferior” beers that have been launched will be compensated with a one-year supply of Hells Lager, Camden said. The recall is supported by a national television commercial, […]]]>

Camden Town Brewery launched “the world’s first” positive beer recall to educate consumers on its brewing process, he said.

Consumers who manage to find any of the 50 “inferior” beers that have been launched will be compensated with a one-year supply of Hells Lager, Camden said.

The recall is supported by a national television commercial, which features a press conference, held by an illustrated Camden employee and voiced by comedian Lolly Adefope.

The press conference announces the voluntary recall of a small batch of cans of Camden Hells Lager that were accidentally pasteurized and distributed across the UK.

Drinkers will know if they have found any of the pasteurized cans, as they are covered with warning stickers and are designed to “look as horrible as they taste,” Camden said.

Consumers who report a pasteurized can to Camden’s “Always Fresh But Not This Time” hotline will be compensated with a one-year supply of Hells Lager, he said.

Complainants will receive a regular delivery of 24 cans of Camden Hells Lager to their doors each month for 12 months.

Camden said the campaign will help raise awareness of its “fresh, never pasteurized beers.”

He said he “would never dream” of intentionally pasteurizing his beers like “other breweries” because the heating process alters the taste.

The beer recall announcement will run for four weeks and “let beer lovers know that pasteurizing beer is the biggest mistake Camden can ever make,” he said.

The campaign was created by advertising agency Wieden & Kennedy, in collaboration with director James Papper and illustrator Vivienne Shao.

Camden Town Brewery Marketing Manager Zoe Wulfsohn-Dunkley said it would “increase national awareness and testing of our flagship Hells Lager and support the UK distribution of our delicious chilled beers.”


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Sour beer compounds followed during the brewing process | Research https://langcreekbrewery.com/sour-beer-compounds-followed-during-the-brewing-process-research/ Thu, 27 Aug 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/sour-beer-compounds-followed-during-the-brewing-process-research/ Sour beers are made through a unique yet opaque brewing process that has been used in Europe for centuries. Now, American chemists are using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to elucidate the chemistry going on when brewing sour beer. The research, which aims to enable sour beer makers to produce […]]]>

Sour beers are made through a unique yet opaque brewing process that has been used in Europe for centuries. Now, American chemists are using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to elucidate the chemistry going on when brewing sour beer.

The research, which aims to enable sour beer makers to produce a better, more predictable product by shedding light on beverage flavor modifiers and their likely sources, was co-led by a husband-and-wife team from the University. of Redlands. Teresa longin and David soulsby presented their work to American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting. While previous research has looked at the components of finished sour beers, their study is unique because they worked with samples of in-process beer from many different batches.

Sour beers start out the same way any beer does – a brewer boils grains like wheat and barley to release sugars. When making regular beer, brewers usually choose a strain of yeast and work hard to keep other microbes out because they want a particular flavor profile, but the process is quite different for sour beers.

‘The sour beer brewer just throws all kinds of creatures, and some of them like Brettanomyces are known to produce particular flavors, but sometimes these brewers don’t quite know what went into their beer, ”Longin said. Often times, they just leave the beer open to the environment so that the wild yeast and bacteria fall in and ferment.

Flavor barrels

Freshly brewed sour beer is often transferred to wooden barrels where it matures for several months, or even up to three years. As they age in barrels, microbes produce many metabolic products, including ethanol, acids, and esters, which contribute to their distinctive tart taste.

This is because the wooden barrels themselves infuse traces of components like vanillin and catechin, imparting flavors reminiscent of things like vanilla, grass, and leather.

While these barrels are generally considered pristine environments in which beer, wine, and other spirits can age, they are full of potentially confusing crevices and nooks and crannies. Even though brewers steam clean these barrels and sometimes use sulfur to kill the organisms that thrive inside, unforeseen chemistry still occurs.

“Things are hiding, and so once you add this nutrient-rich source, those things come out of the wood and then start to individually affect the flavor profile,” Soldsby explained.

Longin and Soulsby have teamed up with Brian Doty, the head brewer of nearby Sour Cellars. Doty began collecting samples from different batches of his barrel-aged sour ale every two to four weeks for about a year. He provided researchers with about 15 samples per batch, and each batch came from a particular barrel.

After analyzing the samples using NMR and LC-MS instruments, the team determined which compounds were present in beer and how the concentrations of those compounds changed over time. NMR allowed them to easily track abundantly acidic and flavorful molecules like acetic acid, lactic acid, and succinic acid, while LC-MS captured more unusual compounds that contribute more subtly to flavor.

NMR data revealed that ethanol, lactic acid, acetic acid, and succinic acid all had delays in onset. “Ethanol usually starts immediately because the Saccharomyces the yeast is introduced into the fermentation and this turns those sugars into ethanol, but even then there is sometimes a delay of about two months before the ethanol really starts to take off, ”Soulsby recalled.

There were similar results with lactic acid and acetic acid, which came from different bacteria. “These bacteria need time to multiply in an environment that is suitable for them,” he explained. “So after about maybe after four months, acetic acid starts to build and lactic acid starts to build.”

Using LC-MS, researchers identified a number of compounds in beer, most of which are high in nitrogen. For example, they found hordatins, which are known to come from barley and have antifungal properties, as well as the amino acid tryptophan and a compound that is the product of the reaction of tryptophan with acetaldehyde, which comes from ethanol.

While hordatin levels have remained fairly constant, overall tryptophan has declined over time. Some of the trace compounds started at high concentrations and then wore off, and the researchers felt that they may have been sugars consumed by yeasts and bacteria. Other compounds have developed over time, and scientists have proposed that they are additional organic acids, phenolics, or vanillin.

The researchers plan to dig deeper into their data to determine whether Doty could have put hops in the beer that could have interacted with the bacteria and possibly alter some of their processes.


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Exploring the Beer Brewing Process After a Super Bowl Corn Ride – Ohio Ag Net https://langcreekbrewery.com/exploring-the-beer-brewing-process-after-a-super-bowl-corn-ride-ohio-ag-net/ Thu, 13 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/exploring-the-beer-brewing-process-after-a-super-bowl-corn-ride-ohio-ag-net/ By Joël Penhorwood It all started with a Super Bowl commercial. These little 30- to 60-second on-screen spots, usually meant to be funny (sometimes they actually are), had an ad from beer maker Bud Light that backhandedly touted the fact that Bud Light is made without syrup. corn, which they also pointed out was used […]]]>

By Joël Penhorwood

It all started with a Super Bowl commercial.

These little 30- to 60-second on-screen spots, usually meant to be funny (sometimes they actually are), had an ad from beer maker Bud Light that backhandedly touted the fact that Bud Light is made without syrup. corn, which they also pointed out was used by their competitors.

Corn growers were quick to respond, including the National Corn Growers Association, issuing a statement saying the ads were misleading and portrayed corn syrup in a negative light. In recent weeks, a judge has even ordered Anheuser-Busch (the parent company of the Bud Light brand) to stop using the words “corn syrup” in attack ads without further context. This is the result of an ongoing lawsuit by competitor MillerCoors.

The point is, yes, Bud Light is made without the use of corn syrup, although rice is used instead to derive the sugars essential for the beer brewing process. Other Anheuser-Busch beers include corn syrup in their creation.

A number of emotional thoughts, chases and changes in drinking habits were made in the days and weeks following the incident, with the continued use of advertising continuing to cause grief. Many of these drinks in question are produced on the north side of Columbus at the Anheuser-Busch plant just south of the 270.

“We bought this land from a local farmer here in Columbus and opened the land in 1966. We opened in 1968. In our first year, we were able to produce about 1.8 million barrels of beer. . Since then we have actually doubled our capacity more than twice and today we can produce almost 10 million barrels of beer in a calendar year, ”said Josh Zabek, senior general manager of Columbus Brewery. Anheuser-Busch. “We have about 500 full-time employees working here. During the summer months, we’re actually going to scale up and have 600 employees who are here full time. We are active 24/7 and brew beer 365 days a year. We produce and pack almost every day of the year.

About 20 brands are brewed at the Columbus plant, including branded items such as Budweiser, Bud Light, Michelob Ultra, Busch, Busch-Light, Natural Light, Landshark, Bud Light Lime, Select 55, and Rolling Rock, between others, including non-alcohol brands.

“We make a pretty wide range of beers, some of which aren’t known to a lot of people, come from a brewery right here in Columbus, Ohio,” Zabek said.

With so much production, Zabek said farming is essential to their success and that they remain well integrated into their farming community.

“Everyone knows that malt is used to make many different beers. We use a lot of rice in our Budweiser and Bud Light, but we also use a lot of corn. Corn grits and corn syrup in Busch and Busch-Light and many other products, ”he said. “We are very happy to be close to many of our farmers in the local community and to know that we depend on them. We depend on all of our farmers in the United States.

The brewing process brings these agricultural products together and puts them to work to create the end product that many enjoy. Matt Kaminske is the Chief Brewmaster at Anheuser-Busch in Columbus, and detailed this unique procedure from start to finish.

“Our process really starts with the unloading of the grain,” he said. “We will bring up to six cars a day, at least five days a week for about 500 million pounds passing through this facility. Whole grain rice, whole grain barley malt and we also bring corn grits. We use different combinations depending on what we’re brewing that week. We then move that grain to our elevators where we store millions of pounds of grain that are used in the brewing process every week.

“We also unload dextrose syrup here, which we receive from Cargill in Dayton, Ohio – over 30 million pounds per year of dextrose that we bring to this facility to make our valuable branded products,” Kaminske said. “It’s from the farmers of Ohio. As a business, more than 16 million bushels of corn per year pass through our facilities.

From the grain unloading process, the grains eventually enter the brewhouse and are added to a mash cooker, a huge stainless steel tub, designed to do most of the “heavy lifting” in the brewing process.

“From there we get into the lagering process. This is where we take the mash that we developed in the mash cooker and we try to separate the mash from that stream. Out of this process comes depleted grains which are then collected and ultimately sold to local farmers for livestock feed. The wort then goes into the brew kettle and sets up many different processes. This is where the hops are added, a key process in the profile of a Budweiser vs. a Michelob vs. an Ultra. The hops help stabilize the wort and really set up the rest of the processes as we go downstream of the fermentation, ”Kaminske said.

The whole process can take almost 10 hours to pass from the grain entering the stove until it is ready with yeast and cooled for fermentation. The brewery isn’t a cool place to work either, with air temperatures reaching well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

“From the brewing process, we then set the stage for fermentation. This is where we cool the brew, we add the yeast, and we really start the fermentation process, ”he said. “Depending on the different recipes we have, that will dictate how long these infusions will stay in the fermentation process afterwards.”

The infusions will stay in the large upright fermentation vessels for about a week before moving on to the second stage of the aging process.

“The primary fermentation will move on to the secondary fermentation in the beech wood aging vats, our chip vats as we call them. This is where we add beech wood chips. This is really what helps make the beer clean, crunchy, refreshing and showcases it for Bud and Bud Light, or our other brands when we dictate the recipes, ”Kaminske said.

The beer is then removed from the chip tanks, filtered several times and incorporated into the final product before being packaged. All packaging is done on site at the facility with three can lines, three bottle lines and a 24 hour draw line.

“The can line is capable of producing 2,100 cans per minute and has an increasing capacity to produce almost 40,000 cases over an eight hour period. At full capacity, this brewery can produce almost half a million cases of beer in a 24 hour period, ”Zabek said. “It’s a very fast and complex operation. We ship approximately 230 full beer trailers from this facility every day. “

The Anheuser-Busch factory highlights a simple fact of agriculture that is sometimes hard to see from the fields: Agricultural products are essential in thriving industries, such as beer brewing. No matter what you think of Bud Light and its controversial commercials, the point is, it’s started a conversation about the day-to-day use of farming, and that’s a good thing.


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Florida beer used butterflies in the brewing process https://langcreekbrewery.com/florida-beer-used-butterflies-in-the-brewing-process/ Wed, 22 May 2019 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/florida-beer-used-butterflies-in-the-brewing-process/ A small brown butterfly from Florida provided a key ingredient for a new conservation-conscious beer from First Magnitude Brewing in Gainesville. The yeast for Frosted Elfin New England-Style Session Pale Ale comes from the bodies of frosted elves living in the Apalachicola National Forest. The butterflies once ranged from central Florida to Ontario, the US […]]]>

A small brown butterfly from Florida provided a key ingredient for a new conservation-conscious beer from First Magnitude Brewing in Gainesville.

The yeast for Frosted Elfin New England-Style Session Pale Ale comes from the bodies of frosted elves living in the Apalachicola National Forest. The butterflies once ranged from central Florida to Ontario, the US Fish & Wildlife Service said, but have declined nationwide due to habitat loss.

The beer was the result of a collaboration between the brewery and scientists at the Florida Museum of Natural History, who captured the butterflies and gently dabbed them for yeast before releasing them into the forest. These yeast samples were multiplied in Petri dishes to produce what was needed for brewing.

This flowery-smelling yeast was part of what resulted in a tropical, fruity, hoppy and hazy lager that went on sale in the First Magnitude tasting room on May 17 for $ 12.50 per pack of four. . Beer is also sold in some stores around Gainesville, including Lucky’s Market. The brewery will host another outing event at the Brass Tap in Tallahassee on May 25.

Jaret Daniels, a professor at the University of Florida and director of the museum’s Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, told US Fish & Wildlife he’s looking for a way to involve a new demographic, especially beer drinkers, in the conversation.

A portion of the proceeds from each can goes directly to research on butterflies. Researchers also hope the exhibit raises awareness of the Frosted Elf.

Butterflies naturally collect yeast on their bodies from forest flora. In a press release posted to the museum’s website, Daniels noted that although the scientists were able to collect the yeast directly from the host plants, they believed that “it would be much cooler to remove it from the butterfly itself- same”.

Wild plant yeast has already been collected for making beer, but the project appears to be the first time it has been collected from an insect.

Contact Christopher Spata at cspata@tampabay.com or follow @SpataTimes on Twitter.


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Temperature monitoring in the brewing process https://langcreekbrewery.com/temperature-monitoring-in-the-brewing-process/ Thu, 26 Jul 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/temperature-monitoring-in-the-brewing-process/ In England’s recent World Cup match against Croatia, around 10,000,000 pints of beer were consumed, according to estimates from the British Beer and Pub Association. In light of these numbers, this article will explain the importance of monitoring beer temperature throughout the brewing and manufacturing process. Craft beer is growing in popularity, and with over […]]]>

In England’s recent World Cup match against Croatia, around 10,000,000 pints of beer were consumed, according to estimates from the British Beer and Pub Association. In light of these numbers, this article will explain the importance of monitoring beer temperature throughout the brewing and manufacturing process.

Craft beer is growing in popularity, and with over 2,000 breweries currently operating in the UK, it’s more important than ever to make sure your product is both consistent and fragrant. Temperature, as most brewers are well aware, is a vital consideration when producing or storing beer.

For example, in the brewing process it is imperative to monitor the temperature of the water, as this is when the enzymes in barley are activated, which turns them into sugar. Brewers can handle the types of sugars produced by raising or lowering the temperature of the water, typically between 37 ° C and 76 ° C.

For a drier tasting beer, lower water temperatures are preferable, as they create highly fermentable sugar. To produce a smoother, fuller-bodied beer, retention of certain unfermented sugars is important. This is achieved through higher water temperatures, which means that the sugars are less easily digested by the yeast.

The Hanwell Lite NL300 is equipped with an external thermistor probe and offers constant, reliable and precise monitoring of the water temperature, with the possibility of receiving immediate warnings if the temperature exceeds predetermined limits. This allows brewers to ensure that each batch of beer meets their high standards.

Helpful tips for beer suppliers

Temperature monitoring during beer production can be vital, but that doesn’t mean it should be ignored during storage or serving. Too cold stouts or hot lagers just aren’t palatable.

The Hanwell Lite kit stores beers at the temperatures recommended by the Beer Connoisseur, which makes it ideal for bars, pubs and other hotel establishments to keep control of their refrigerators. The kit requires minimal setup and can offer real-time data and warning systems to improve product quality for a variety of small outlets in the hospitality industry.

This information has been obtained, reviewed and adapted from documents provided by Hanwell Soultions Ltd.

For more information on this source, please visit Hanwell Soultions Ltd.


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AB InBev creates more sustainable brewing process and shares patent https://langcreekbrewery.com/ab-inbev-creates-more-sustainable-brewing-process-and-shares-patent/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/ab-inbev-creates-more-sustainable-brewing-process-and-shares-patent/ Beer giant AB InBev introduced a new technique to become more environmentally friendly when brewing beer, which is expected to reduce its carbon emissions worldwide by 5%. It will also share this technology with smaller breweries in the future. Gas bubbles without cooking AB InBev will become much greener by brewing beer: the brewing group […]]]>

Beer giant AB InBev introduced a new technique to become more environmentally friendly when brewing beer, which is expected to reduce its carbon emissions worldwide by 5%. It will also share this technology with smaller breweries in the future.

Gas bubbles without cooking

AB InBev will become much greener by brewing beer: the brewing group has developed an innovative technique in its research center in Leuven, which creates gas bubbles without the need for a lot of heat and water. Bubbles are essential to the flavor of beer, but until now they could only be generated after an intensive cooking process.

“With this new technique, we blow gas into the brewing kettle through a new element. This allows the base fluid to stay just below the boiling point, without affecting the identity and flavor of the beer, ”said David De Schutter, Director R&D Europe at AB InBev.

The environmental impact of this innovation is impressive: according to the brewer, its own breweries would reduce its carbon emissions by 5% and its water consumption by 0.5%.

Free for small breweries

These figures may increase if other breweries use the same technique, as AB InBev will open its patent to smaller breweries free of charge. Large beer makers will have to pay a royalty based on their volumes and the impact of innovation. De Schutter said it would be a good investment, as “once implemented it will be paid back within 2 years”.

AB InBev presented the technique at the “Trends in brewing” event in Ghent, a month after revealing its ambitious sustainability goals. “The new technique is an important way to reduce our carbon emissions by 25% by 2025, but it is certainly not the only thing we are looking at,” added De Schutter. “We’re also looking at smart agriculture, water management, and circular packaging. “


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Hudson Valley Craft Beer Festival showcases the brewing process https://langcreekbrewery.com/hudson-valley-craft-beer-festival-showcases-the-brewing-process/ Sat, 16 Sep 2017 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/hudson-valley-craft-beer-festival-showcases-the-brewing-process/ BEACON – Armed with a pitcher of his Bannerman’s Ale, Duncans Abbey owner Justin DiNino approached other brewers at the craft beer festival and advertised himself as “the beer ambassador” with samples at to share. He ended up pouring the strong Belgian “wild yeast” beer into the glass belonging to Mike O’Herron, the 31-year-old owner […]]]>

BEACON – Armed with a pitcher of his Bannerman’s Ale, Duncans Abbey owner Justin DiNino approached other brewers at the craft beer festival and advertised himself as “the beer ambassador” with samples at to share.

He ended up pouring the strong Belgian “wild yeast” beer into the glass belonging to Mike O’Herron, the 31-year-old owner of Two Way Brewing in Beacon. O’Herron, who takes yeast from black raspberries grown on a farm in Newburgh, was curious about this particular strain, and DiNino was happy to explain it.

Duncans Abbey owner Justin DiNino discusses the process with Mike O'Herron, the 31-year-old owner of Two Way Brewing in Beacon.  They have different methods of collecting yeast.

There are three other basic ingredients used in beer – malt, hops, and water – but yeast often gives it its flavor and can be produced in a variety of ways.

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DiNino said the brewery simply places its barrels of beer along the Hudson River in Tarrytown and waits for the yeast in the air to attach to the product and start to eat away at the sugar.


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