Beer production – Lang Creek Brewery http://langcreekbrewery.com/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 21:13:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://langcreekbrewery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png Beer production – Lang Creek Brewery http://langcreekbrewery.com/ 32 32 Craft beer experts support BrewBilt’s quality craft beer production processes https://langcreekbrewery.com/craft-beer-experts-support-brewbilts-quality-craft-beer-production-processes/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 19:10:25 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/craft-beer-experts-support-brewbilts-quality-craft-beer-production-processes/ News and research before you hear about it on CNBC and others. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here. GRASS VALLEY, Calif., June 29, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NewMediaWire — Today BrewBilt Brewing Company (the “Company”) (OTCPINK: BRBL) CEO Jef Lewis announced that its systems, materials and processes create craft beers […]]]>

News and research before you hear about it on CNBC and others. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here.


GRASS VALLEY, Calif., June 29, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — via NewMediaWire — Today BrewBilt Brewing Company (the “Company”) (OTCPINK: BRBL) CEO Jef Lewis announced that its systems, materials and processes create craft beers of the highest quality.

Lewis said, “BrewBilt Brewing is dedicated to modern execution of traditional styles using handcrafted, industry-leading equipment combined with a crafty approach and passion for quality. The focus on locally sourced, locally sourced malt, premium hops and crystal clear water gives us a dynamic palette for decidedly satisfying beers. Inspired by European brewing tradition and American craftsmanship innovation, we aim to create beers that reflect a sense of place and our shared brewing philosophy for your ultimate drinking pleasure. Our expert staff is comprised of industry veterans who use professional-grade, American-made brewing equipment and ingredients to deliver exceptional craft beer across North America and Europe.

Lewis added, “Like any other great product, our craft beer starts in our American-made, professional-grade stainless steel brewhouse. Many breweries in the United States have sacrificed producing quality beer by using low-cost Chinese stainless steel. American stainless steel is three times stronger than Chinese steel, and in addition to its higher overall strength, American stainless steel has lower oxidation levels than Chinese stainless steel. This means American stainless steel is less likely to rust over time and will degrade much slower than the competition. This affects the craft beer making process and can mean the difference between mediocre craft beer and great tasting craft beer. It also affects the shelf life and the relationship with your customers.

Lewis continued, “What is more important is our society and our vibe here in the United States when it comes to our environment and our planet. American stainless steel is manufactured with respect for the environment, as we are held to a set of higher standards created by organizations such as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) which determine the appropriate chemical mixtures for different types of stainless steel. These standards are intended as an ecological and safety precaution to ensure that the correct quality of metal is used for the correct product. Chinese companies are producing steel at a faster rate, flooding the market and driving prices down. It is produced at a rapid pace and is not held to the same quality standards as American stainless steel.

“Overall, American stainless steel has so many advantages over Chinese stainless steel that the decision is a no-brainer. China has produced around half of the world’s steel in recent years, but the country’s steel industry is a major source of air pollutants, particularly particulate matter, SO2 and NOx emissions. Although China has tried to reduce its steel production to mitigate pollution, some factories are increasing their capacity and China’s steel production is on the rise.

Follow us on Twitter (@BrewBiltBrewing) and Instagram (@BrewBilt_Brewing)

ABOUT BREWBILT BREWING COMPANY: (http://www.brewbiltbrewing.com)

Located in the Sierra foothills of Northern California, BrewBilt Brewing Company produces its own BrewBilt brand beers, as well as private label and contract brewing services. BrewBilt Brewing grew out of BrewBilt Manufacturing Inc., an iconic company that has been handcrafting custom brewhouses and fermentation systems since 2014. BrewBilt Brewing’s production staff are industry veterans who will use equipment and high-quality brewing ingredients to deliver exceptional craft beer in California and beyond.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS: This press release contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements provide current expectations or forecasts of future events and are not guarantees of future performance, nor should they be taken to represent the opinions of management as of any future date. Forward-looking statements are based on management’s expectations and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. Although management believes that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these statements. The risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially include, but are not limited to, the Company’s ability to effectively execute its business plans; unforeseen construction delays; the Company’s need for additional capital; changes in general economic and financial market conditions; changes in the competitive environment; dispute; losses, customer bankruptcy, claims and appraisals; and regulatory or legislative requirements affecting the Company’s business. Management may choose to update forward-looking statements at any time; however, it expressly disclaims any obligation to do so.

Contact:Jef Lewis, CEOBrewBilt Brewing Company – BRBL(530) 802-0036[email protected]

Source: BrewBilt Brewery

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Source: BrewBilt Brewery

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4,000 years ago, Chinese advances were fueled by the massive production of beer! https://langcreekbrewery.com/4000-years-ago-chinese-advances-were-fueled-by-the-massive-production-of-beer/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 13:55:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/4000-years-ago-chinese-advances-were-fueled-by-the-massive-production-of-beer/ What were the significant forces and factors that led to notable evolutionary leaps in Chinese culture over 4,000 years ago? New research identifies a major cultural development that helped initiate high-level civilizational change, and it’s a revelation. These researchers claim that a significant innovation in brewing technology, which created the possibility of mass production of […]]]>

What were the significant forces and factors that led to notable evolutionary leaps in Chinese culture over 4,000 years ago? New research identifies a major cultural development that helped initiate high-level civilizational change, and it’s a revelation. These researchers claim that a significant innovation in brewing technology, which created the possibility of mass production of beer, had a profound impact on the ancient Chinese people, who truly appreciated the opportunity to consume this fermented drink. at large-scale public events.

Red rice beer was said to be considered desirable for its flavor, mind-altering effects, and “sacred” red hue. A team of scientists from China and the United States published their study in the journal Archaeological and anthropological sciences and it revealed that mass beer production technology led to vigorous commercial activity and knowledge exchange among the Neolithic peoples of ancient China, the scientists write in their journal article, and it is this enthusiasm shared about a fermented alcohol product that ultimately helped spark the birth of a dynastic dynasty. Chinese civilization.

New social bonds produced by certain cultural practices are the seeds from which larger, more advanced and more ambitious civilizations can emerge. And the mass production of beer in China thousands of years ago provided a key ingredient for large gatherings and therefore larger social networks. The ancient Chinese civilization began to become more cohesive and united from the fourth millennium BCE, with previous divisions countered by various centralizing forces and factors.

These circumstances set the stage for the rise of the first ruling dynasty in China, the Xia dynasty founded by Yu the Great around 2070 BC. The rulers of the Xia dynasty were able to rule effectively in a country that now shared a stronger sense of unified purpose and identity. And mass beer production was instrumental in this leap forward in evolution in China around 4,000 years ago.

The Dakougang vessels examined in the study, which led to the conclusion that mass beer production capabilities had a profound effect on Chinese development from around 4,000 years ago. ( Archaeological and anthropological sciences )

From mass beer production to the unification of new party networks

Alcoholic fermentation as a science was discovered in China at least 9,000 years ago. A Dartmouth College study published in 2021 showed that ceremonial drinking vessels excavated from an ancient burial site in Qiaotou, China’s Zhejiang province, contained preserved traces of red rice beer, confirming that this particular drink had been consumed for a very long time.

It took a few thousand years for the knowledge of alcohol making to spread more widely. The influence of the mass production and consumption of beer in ancient China created the conditions for a rapid evolution of “mass” cultural exchange and transfer of knowledge.

The Chinese Dawenkou Culture, which was built by settlers in the area of ​​present-day Shandong Province in eastern China between 4,600 and 6,700 years ago, created the recipe and methodology for fermentation that facilitated the mass production of beer. They made their distinctive red rice beer in large clay basins called dakougangs, which represented a major advance in alcohol-making technology. It was this technology that was at the center of the new study, which attempted to find out exactly how the dakougangs had been used and for how long.

“Dakougangs were not made in all settlements, but were mostly found in large elite burials,” said study co-author Li Liu, a professor of Chinese archeology at the University. from Stanford, to the South China Morning Post. “It is unclear exactly where the dakougangs were made, how they were distributed, or if they were traded as trade items.”

At that time, elites competed for recognition in part by hosting gigantic community parties. Red rice beer, a specialty product believed to have sacred qualities, would have been highly coveted at such festivals. Therefore, dakougang-style fermentation technology would have been in high demand as knowledge of it quickly spread westward along growing trade networks.

“Individuals who could provide large quantities of these beverages would have been more competitive for status and prestige in the community,” the authors wrote in their Archaeological and anthropological sciences article. “Particularly if the drinks were of the exotic type.”

Dakougangs would have been placed in the open at parties and other public events. They would have been filled with enough red rice beer to keep the spirits up all day.

“The parties could have fostered an element of togetherness among attendees, signaled various types of information to attendees and the wider community, and enhanced the prestige of hosts,” Professor Liu wrote in a separate post on the subject. in 2021.

These vessels found at the Yuchisi site in Anhui province, China, were analyzed as part of the study on mass beer production technology.  (Archaeological and anthropological sciences)

These vessels found on the Yuchisi site, Anhui province, China was analyzed in the study on mass beer production technology . ( Archaeological and anthropological sciences )

New study proves that Chinese dakougangs held a fermented elixir

Six thousand years ago, Chinese civilization was altered by the development of what scholars call a “sphere of interaction.” The term was coined by archeology professor Kwang-chih Chang in the 1980s, and it describes a unique period when once-separate societies became more complex, layered, and interactive as they gradually began to form a state of more collective spirit.

In their Archaeological and anthropological sciences study, scientists identify the sphere of interaction as a period beginning in the fourth millennium BCE when Neolithic cultures in China “experienced increased cross-regional interactions, characterized by strikingly similar artifacts spread over an unprecedented area, including certain forms of ceramic vessels”. These vessels were the dakougangs, which had been unearthed during the excavations of elite burials in all regions of the country.

Prior to this new study, the real purpose of the 16 to 28 inch (40 to 70 centimeter) tall dakougangs had eluded researchers. To determine how they were actually used, scientists analyzed microfossil remains of fungi, starch and phytoliths found in salvaged dakougangs and in jars and cups removed during excavations at the late Dawenkou culture site in Yuchisi in Anhui Province.

These tests revealed that the large basins and drinking vessels had in fact contained a fermented drink. This drink was eventually identified as red rice beer, said to have been made from an eclectic mix of rice, millet, Job’s tears, Triticeae, and snake gourd root. A fermentation starter named that is said to have been created from a mold known as monascus, and this substance is still used to make this type of drink today.

It was the monascus that gave the powerful alcoholic drink its red hue. This hue was considered metaphysically significant due to its resemblance to the color of blood.

“The symbolic implication of the color red associated with the seemingly magical transformation of cereals into alcohol, as well as the psychoactive effect of the drink, may have contributed to the importance of red rice beer, which was probably considered a sacred substance,” the paper’s co-authors wrote.

This would have been one more reason why status-conscious elites across the country would have been interested in learning the secrets of mass beer production.

China’s elite-centric culture has been bolstered by beer!

In the end, a shared interest in this drink has made it possible to forge culturally unifying links between different peoples. But within these larger alliances, social stratification remained very real, with the privilege of making this sacred drink reserved for the elites.

The community could enjoy mass-produced alcohol at parties. But ordinary citizens would not have had the right to brew it themselves. People would have liked to attend celebration parties of local elites, but they would not have been able to sponsor such parties themselves.

Mass production of beer would have been useful as a means of increasing power among the already powerful, and therefore monopolies over its mass production would have been zealously sought by the wealthy and status-conscious in all parts of the world. regions of the country.

Top image: Ancient amphoras, China. Source: lotus jeremy / Adobe Stock

By Nathan Falde

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Rusty Bull Takes Over Beer Production at Downtown Charleston Brewery | Food https://langcreekbrewery.com/rusty-bull-takes-over-beer-production-at-downtown-charleston-brewery-food/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/rusty-bull-takes-over-beer-production-at-downtown-charleston-brewery-food/ A brewery located less than a mile from the North Charleston Coliseum will now have a presence on King Street in downtown Charleston. Rusty Bull Brewing Co. owners Ben Mayer and Brian Bogstad will take over the beer production program at Chucktown Brewery, which became the only brewery in historic Charleston when it opens in […]]]>

A brewery located less than a mile from the North Charleston Coliseum will now have a presence on King Street in downtown Charleston.

Rusty Bull Brewing Co. owners Ben Mayer and Brian Bogstad will take over the beer production program at Chucktown Brewery, which became the only brewery in historic Charleston when it opens in 2021.

Chucktown Brewery will host a celebration welcoming the Rusty Bull team on June 12.

Over the next few weeks, Rusty Bull beers will gradually arrive on taps at Chucktown Brewery, with specialty collaborative beers to come. Chucktown Brewery will continue its small-batch, on-site brewing program with guidance from Mayer and Bogstad, while Rusty Bull beers served at Chucktown Brewery will continue to be brewed at Rusty Bull’s brewery and tasting room in North Charleston.

Nate Tomforde of Chucktown Brewery, who will retain full ownership, called the partnership “one of the first combined local concepts we’ve seen where two breweries really come together to collaborate and share resources.”

In addition to the beers, the Chucktown Brewery menu could see some small changes, Tomforde said, with some of the bites served at Rusty Bull appearing at the Chucktown Brewery.


Charleston restaurants add revenue streams with virtual kitchens and beverage distribution







Bellyitcher Ale (copy)

Rusty Bull once teamed up with the RiverDogs of Charleston to create BellyItcher lager. File/Provided


“It’s not a takeover, it’s not a buyout, it’s a real collaboration,” said Tomforde, who has known Mayer and Bogstad for years and owns a brewery, winery and restaurants in Greenville. This includes Southernside Brewing Co. on the Swamp Rabbit Trail and the Pour Taproom, which started in Asheville, North Carolina.

Tomforde introduced self-service For Taproom on downtown Charleston’s King Street in 2017, the same year Rusty Bull opened at 3005 W. Montague Ave. The three business owners have been in a relationship ever since.

“We kind of hit the market together,” Bogstad said. “We already loved working together and it’s a cool way for us to collaborate.”


Chucktown Brewdown Contest at Fam's Features Lowcountry Home Brewers

Collaboration has recently become a key part of Charleston’s craft brewery lineup, but it’s always been big at Rusty Bull. Team efforts with the Charleston RiverDogs (BellyItcher blonde ale) and Charleston Battery (Striker’s Wit witbier) at Carmella’s Cafe & Dessert Bar (Carmella’s Blood Orange Seltzer), Mayer and Bogstad co-brewed beers with business owners from all over the Charleston area.

The brewers plan to bring that philosophy to the Chucktown Brewery, open from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.

Collaboration is key for 2 Charleston-area breweries

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Prism Brewing returns to beer production… No comment on what the immediate future holds https://langcreekbrewery.com/prism-brewing-returns-to-beer-production-no-comment-on-what-the-immediate-future-holds/ Tue, 24 May 2022 17:00:05 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/prism-brewing-returns-to-beer-production-no-comment-on-what-the-immediate-future-holds/ In October 2017, Prism Brewing (Lansdale, Pennsylvania) posted a simple message on social media signifying the end of its operations. And it seems that after almost 5 years, the Montgomery County brewery has resurfaced. However, as of this writing, don’t expect a physical Prism Brewing location anytime soon. (At least not in their original location […]]]>

In October 2017, Prism Brewing (Lansdale, Pennsylvania) posted a simple message on social media signifying the end of its operations. And it seems that after almost 5 years, the Montgomery County brewery has resurfaced. However, as of this writing, don’t expect a physical Prism Brewing location anytime soon. (At least not in their original location as the McAllisters Brewing team are currently thriving there).

The brewery has resurrected its brand thanks to the team at Co-Hops Cannery in Hatfield, PA. For those unfamiliar, Co-Hops is something of a brewery incubator. Rather than focusing on its own beer production, Co-Hops uses the majority of its brewing operations to contract beers brewed for other brands. You can learn more about how they work here.

– Advertisement –

So, in short, beer produced under the Prism brand is for distribution only. Or at least that is the assumption that is made. We reached out to Prism to find out a bit more about their current model. Asked about the comeback, Prism Brewery owner Rob DiMaria said the following:

“Our comeback is in the early stages and more details will be announced as we progress. We are excited to work with Co-Hops and love being in the brewery making beer that we love and that our customers enjoy. have missed.

No further word was provided on what the future holds for the brewery. Only time will tell if this is a short-term plan or if there are intentions to rebuild the Prism Brewing brand into its own operation.

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BEER PRODUCTION IN UKRAINE RECOVERS AFTER SHARP DROP IN MARCH https://langcreekbrewery.com/beer-production-in-ukraine-recovers-after-sharp-drop-in-march/ Mon, 16 May 2022 20:32:39 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/beer-production-in-ukraine-recovers-after-sharp-drop-in-march/ Beer production in Ukraine (except non-alcoholic beer with an alcohol content of up to 0.5% by volume) in January-April 2022 decreased by 42.8% compared to the first four month of 2021, to 28 million decalitres.As reported on the website of the industrial organization of brewers Ukrpivo on Monday, in the first quarter of 2022, the […]]]>

Beer production in Ukraine (except non-alcoholic beer with an alcohol content of up to 0.5% by volume) in January-April 2022 decreased by 42.8% compared to the first four month of 2021, to 28 million decalitres.
As reported on the website of the industrial organization of brewers Ukrpivo on Monday, in the first quarter of 2022, the decline in beer production amounted to 49.9% compared to January-March 2021, from 34.1 million dekaliters to 17.1 million dekaliters.
Thus, in April of this year, 10.9 million deciliters of beer were produced, or 39% of the total volume of this drink produced since the beginning of the year.
At the same time, malt production in January-April 2022 decreased by 55.6% compared to the same date in 2021 – to 37.0 thousand tons, while in the first quarter of 2022 its production decreased by 40.8% .
As noted, in 2021 Ukraine produced 5% less beer compared to 2020 – 170.5 million dekaliters, and in 2020 its production decreased by 0.4% compared to 2019 – to 179.7 million decalitres.
Malt production in 2021 amounted to 218.5 thousand tons, which is 19.5% less than in 2020. At the same time, in the penultimate year, its production fell by 18% compared to compared to 2019, to 275 thousand tons.

BEER, MANUFACTURING

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Beer production fell by 46% in Ireland between 2020 and 2021 https://langcreekbrewery.com/beer-production-fell-by-46-in-ireland-between-2020-and-2021/ Tue, 10 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/beer-production-fell-by-46-in-ireland-between-2020-and-2021/ The continued closure of hospitality venues domestically and in key international markets resulted in another tough year for Irish brewers in 2021, but there were some signs of an early recovery in the second half, according to a new report released today. today. Details The directory Irish beer market report from Drinks Ireland|Beer shows that […]]]>

The continued closure of hospitality venues domestically and in key international markets resulted in another tough year for Irish brewers in 2021, but there were some signs of an early recovery in the second half, according to a new report released today. today.

The directory Irish beer market report from Drinks Ireland|Beer shows that the COVID-19 pandemic led to a 46% drop in production between 2020 and 2021, with sales down 1.3% and per capita consumption down 2.3% . Overall alcohol consumption continues to drop dramatically in Ireland, according to Drinks Ireland.

The value of beer exports fell 3% last year, but remained strong at 246 million euros. The most popular destination for Irish beer was Britain, with the United States taking second place.

According to the report, stout sales have been heavily impacted by the pandemic, as stout is primarily consumed in the food trade. Before COVID-19, around 30% of the beer consumed in Ireland was stout. That figure fell to 25.3% in 2020, but rose 6.9% to 32.2% last year. Lager, which was more popular during COVID-19 because it was consumed at home, saw its market share fall last year by just over 8.3%, while the market share of beer increased by 1%.

Non-alcoholic beer is also becoming increasingly popular, with its market share increasing from 1.1% in 2020 to 1.5% in 2021. For context, the non-alcoholic beer market share was 0.4 % in 2017.

Producers are now focused on reviving the sector, but face a range of external pressures such as inflation, which has increased business costs.

To support the recovery and manage these pressures, the sector has called on the government to reduce excise duty on alcohol in this year’s budget as Irish beer drinkers continue to pay the second highest excise rate on alcohol. beer in the EU, according to Drinks Ireland.

Peter Mosley, Managing Director of Porterhouse Brewing Company and Chairman of Drinks Ireland|Beer, said: “Today’s report illustrates the significant impact the pandemic has continued to have on Irish brewers over the past year. , with production particularly affected. consumers returned to the restaurant business in the second half of the year. Before COVID, just over 60% of beer sales were in pubs, restaurants and hotels in Ireland. In 2020, around 29% of beer sales came from the hospitality sector, but this rose to 46% in 2021.

“Irish brewers are now focused on returning to growth, driven by strong industry innovation from both established and emerging players. We have seen some interesting trends in recent years, such as the growth of non-alcoholic beer, which we plan to continue.

Drinks Ireland|Beer Director Jonathan McDade said: “After two of the most difficult years for the brewing industry and the continuing problem of spiraling business costs, we are calling for a reduction in excise duties in the budget of this year. This would allow for more investment and innovation. It would also benefit struggling consumers, who are facing mounting cost of living pressures.

© 2022 Hospitality Ireland – your source for the latest industry news. Article by Dave Simpson. Click subscribe to subscribe to the Hospitality Ireland printed edition.

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Irish beer production plummeted in 2021 but recovery is underway – The Irish Times https://langcreekbrewery.com/irish-beer-production-plummeted-in-2021-but-recovery-is-underway-the-irish-times/ Tue, 10 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/irish-beer-production-plummeted-in-2021-but-recovery-is-underway-the-irish-times/ Beer production fell sharply in the Republic last year, down 46% from 2020, according to figures released by business lobby group Ibec. The number of employees in the sector also fell by a fifth. The Drinks Ireland Division | The group’s Beer suggests that the drop in production was due to a drop in demand […]]]>

Beer production fell sharply in the Republic last year, down 46% from 2020, according to figures released by business lobby group Ibec. The number of employees in the sector also fell by a fifth.

The Drinks Ireland Division | The group’s Beer suggests that the drop in production was due to a drop in demand following the strict anti-virus restrictions on the hospitality sector that were in place for much of 2021. Its report on the market of the beer indicates that around 60% of beer is generally consumed in pubs, but this fell to 29% in 2020 before rising somewhat to 46% in 2021.

The drop in production in 2021 followed a 13% drop the previous year.

While total beer sales fell 1.2% last year compared to 2020 and per capita consumption fell 2.3%, the sector began to mark a clear recovery in the second half of 2021 with the reopening of the food trade and the beginning of home consumption trends. moderate.

Figures provided in the Drinks Ireland|Beer report suggest sales volumes were at pre-pandemic levels during the third quarter of 2021.

Strong demand

Over 32% of all beer sold on the Irish market last year were strong ales, a return to pre-pandemic normalcy. Stout’s share had fallen to around 25% in 2020, when pubs were largely closed for parts of the year. Sales of lager beer, which have soared during periods of confinement, have fallen considerably in 2021.

Non-alcoholic beer sales accounted for just 1.5% of the total, although the proportion is four times higher than four years ago.

The value of beer exports fell 3% last year to 246 million euros, according to the Ibec report. Great Britain, followed by the United States, is the largest export market for beer produced in Ireland. Sales of the beer category contributed approximately €351 million to government revenue.

Peter Mosley, Managing Director of Porterhouse Brewing Company and Chairman of Drinks Ireland | Beer, said the beer market report “illustrates the significant impact the pandemic continued to have on Irish brewers last year, with production particularly hard hit.” He said the sector is now in recovery mode.

The Irish drinks industry, through Ibec and other lobby groups, is renewing its campaign for a budget cut to state excise duty on alcohol. Excise rates in Ireland are among the highest in Europe.

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Irish beer production down 46% due to pandemic, report says https://langcreekbrewery.com/irish-beer-production-down-46-due-to-pandemic-report-says/ Tue, 10 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/irish-beer-production-down-46-due-to-pandemic-report-says/ While hospitality venues were closed for long periods in 2021, beer production suffered a significant drop. According to Drinks Ireland|Beer’s annual Irish beer market report, the pandemic has caused a 46% drop in production between 2020 and 2021. Sales fell 1.3%, while beer exports fell 3% last year to 246 million euros. Alcohol consumption continued […]]]>

While hospitality venues were closed for long periods in 2021, beer production suffered a significant drop.

According to Drinks Ireland|Beer’s annual Irish beer market report, the pandemic has caused a 46% drop in production between 2020 and 2021.

Sales fell 1.3%, while beer exports fell 3% last year to 246 million euros.

Alcohol consumption continued to decline, with per capita beer consumption down 2.3%.

Stout sales have been heavily impacted by the pandemic, as stout is primarily consumed in the food trade.

Before the pandemic, 30% of all beer consumed in Ireland was stout. That figure fell to 25.3% in 2020, but rose 6.9% to 32.2% last year.

Meanwhile, the bigger one was more popular during Covid as it was eaten at home. Its market share fell by just over 8.3%, with beer’s market share increasing by 1%.

The report also shows that non-alcoholic beer is becoming increasingly popular, with its market share increasing from 1.1% in 2020 to 1.5% in 2021. This is a significant increase from the share market growth of 0.4% recorded in 2017.

Peter Mosley, Managing Director of Porterhouse Brewing Company and Chairman of Drinks Ireland | Beer said the report shows the significant impact the pandemic has continued to have on the industry over the past year.

“There were signs of an early recovery as consumers moved back into the food trade in the second half,” Mosley said.

“Before Covid, just over 60% of beer sales were in pubs, restaurants and hotels in Ireland. In 2020, an estimated 29% of beer sales came from the hospitality sector, but this figure rose to 46% in 2021.

“Irish brewers are now focused on returning to growth, driven by strong industry innovation from established and emerging players.

“We’ve seen some interesting trends in recent years, such as the growth of non-alcoholic beer, which we plan to continue.”

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Beer production, sales and exports all fell last year https://langcreekbrewery.com/beer-production-sales-and-exports-all-fell-last-year/ Mon, 09 May 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/beer-production-sales-and-exports-all-fell-last-year/ Beer production in Ireland has fallen by 46% between 2020 and last year, according to new research from Drinks Ireland | Beer, the second year in a row that it has declined. Hospitality venues closed at home and abroad due to Covid-19 restrictions have created difficult conditions for Irish-based brewers, the analysis finds. Sales also […]]]>

Beer production in Ireland has fallen by 46% between 2020 and last year, according to new research from Drinks Ireland | Beer, the second year in a row that it has declined.

Hospitality venues closed at home and abroad due to Covid-19 restrictions have created difficult conditions for Irish-based brewers, the analysis finds.

Sales also fell last year, down 1.3% overall, as per capita consumption fell 2.3%.

“Today’s report illustrates the significant impact the pandemic has continued to have on Irish brewers over the past year, with production particularly affected,” said Peter Mosley, chief executive of Porterhouse Brewing Company and President of Drinks Ireland | Beer.

“There were some signs of an early recovery as consumers returned to the food trade in the second half of the year.”

“Before Covid, just over 60% of beer sales were in pubs, restaurants and hotels in Ireland. In 2020, an estimated 29% of beer sales came from the hospitality sector, but this figure increased to 46% in 2021.”

The Irish beer market report also shows that beer worth €246 million was exported in 2021, down 3% from the previous year when exports also fell.

The largest amount was sent to Britain, with the United States being the second most popular overseas market.

Despite reductions in production, sales and exports, beer remains the most popular drink in Ireland.

Because it is drunk primarily in pubs, stout sales have suffered significantly during the pandemic, but recovered last year from 6.9% to 32.2% in overall market share.

However, sales of lager, which increased as people consumed beer at home during the restrictions in 2020, fell again last year by 8.3%.

While non-alcoholic beer sales fell from 1.1% to 1.5% in 2021.

Overall, however, beer consumption has fallen 9.6% over the past three years and is 30% below its peak in 2001.

“After two of the toughest years for the beer industry and the continuing problem of spiraling business costs, we are calling for an excise duty reduction in this year’s budget,” said Jonathan McDade, director of Drinks. Ireland|Beer.

“This would allow for more investment and innovation in the sector. It would also benefit struggling consumers facing increasing cost of living pressures.”

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Pennsylvania Increases Overall Beer Production For The First Time In Six Years (PA Craft Beer Stats 2021) https://langcreekbrewery.com/pennsylvania-increases-overall-beer-production-for-the-first-time-in-six-years-pa-craft-beer-stats-2021/ Thu, 05 May 2022 15:56:19 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/pennsylvania-increases-overall-beer-production-for-the-first-time-in-six-years-pa-craft-beer-stats-2021/ It’s that time of year. A look back at Pennsylvania Craft Beer’s 2021 stats. As you may know, the Brewers Association publishes publicly available beer production data every year. (You can see all the past details on PA Beer stats here). As we reported in 2020, unsurprisingly, Pennsylvania saw an overall production drop of almost […]]]>

It’s that time of year. A look back at Pennsylvania Craft Beer’s 2021 stats. As you may know, the Brewers Association publishes publicly available beer production data every year. (You can see all the past details on PA Beer stats here).

As we reported in 2020, unsurprisingly, Pennsylvania saw an overall production drop of almost half a million barrels. This should come as no shock as the state was still affected by the Covid pandemic.

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However, as of 2021, the state appears to be bouncing back. As you can see from the list below, this is the first time that global beer production has seen an annual increase in six years:

2016: 3,905,620
2017: 3,724,010
2018: 3,719,475
2019: 3,606,444
2020: 3,156,074
2021: 3,244,840

With 3.2 million barrels of beer produced, Pennsylvania continues to rank second in the world nationwide. For another year, Pennsylvania trailed California for the top spot. With 3.4 million barrels produced, California beat out Pennsylvania with around 200,000 more barrels of beer produced in 2021 (which is almost the same split between these two states from the previous year).

In addition to production, Pennsylvania also remained at the top of the country in many other areas. In fact, in most major categories, the state is no lower than 8th place. Pennsylvania moved up a spot from last year to become the nation’s No. 2 state in economic impact, ranked No. 4 in gallons per adult 21 and older and No. 8 in impact per capita. The state has earned a spot as the second-largest craft brewery by state. A total of 42 new net breweries have been added from 2020 to 2021.

See all the statistics for 2021 for yourself:

Photo courtesy of the Brewers Association

UP AND DOWN TREND

From 2020 to 2021, we’ve seen trends go both ways.

Upward trend:

Needless to say, Pennsylvania appeared to recover from the pandemic in a positive way. In addition to the increase in barrel production, we have also gone from the state with the third most breweries to the second most breweries in the nation.

Stay flat:

Unlike previous years, Pennsylvania didn’t see much of a decline in a variety of areas, rather a lot of data remained flat. The economic impact of $5.5 million remained the same compared to 2020. Additionally, the per capita impact also remained the same.

The one area where Pennsylvania saw a decline was in brewery year-over-year growth, but not by much. As you can see in the chart below, the number of breweries open year-over-year in the state has been trending down over the past five years. 2017 and 2018 being what some might consider “the boom”. However, the lack of brewery growth appears to have a more stable trend, having only declined by 5 in total over the past two years combined.

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