Beer production – Lang Creek Brewery http://langcreekbrewery.com/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 22:59:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://langcreekbrewery.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7-120x120.png Beer production – Lang Creek Brewery http://langcreekbrewery.com/ 32 32 Report shows Australian farmers play vital role in beer production https://langcreekbrewery.com/report-shows-australian-farmers-play-vital-role-in-beer-production/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 19:38:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/report-shows-australian-farmers-play-vital-role-in-beer-production/ Research shows that the brewing industry benefits local communities and especially farmers, supporting nearly 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs. Brewers Association chief executive John Preston said: “Today is National Agriculture Day and as we celebrate Australian farmers, this new report shows just how important brewing is to our agricultural sector. “Australians are drinking beer brewed […]]]>

Research shows that the brewing industry benefits local communities and especially farmers, supporting nearly 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs.

Brewers Association chief executive John Preston said: “Today is National Agriculture Day and as we celebrate Australian farmers, this new report shows just how important brewing is to our agricultural sector.

“Australians are drinking beer brewed in Australia using Australian ingredients from Australian farms in droves. These new figures released today show that Australian brewers have purchased nearly $500 million worth of barley and hops in farms across Australia,” Preston said.

“This production has supported almost 3,000 FTE jobs in the agricultural sector. With more of our largest brewers now buying directly from the farm, the connection between our agricultural sector and brewing has never been stronger. “

The research was conducted by ACIL Allen for the Brewers Association of Australia and its findings underpin the Brewers Association report released today, Australian Brewery: Our Economic and Social Contribution.

The report also shows Australians still love beer, drinking the equivalent of just over 2.5 billion pints (570ml per pint except in South Australia where a schooner is 425ml) of beer produced and sold. retail in the country in 2020-21 with a total retail value of approximately $17 billion annually.

Australians are also embracing responsible drinking, with consumption of medium-strength beer increasing by 130% over the past 25 years.

One of the main conclusions of this report is the importance of the partnership between Australian brewers and the Australian agricultural sector. Australian brewers buy over 1,000,000 tonnes of malting barley from Australian farmers each year and Australian hops are an internationally renowned commodity with growers in Tasmania and Victoria producing over 1,600 metric tonnes a year.

Tony Mahar, Chief Executive of the National Farmers Federation, said: “National Agriculture Day is a great opportunity to celebrate how important Australian farmers are to our beer industry.”

John Bennett, a farmer from the Wimmera region of Victoria who supplies the beer industry, said: “You can’t have great Australian beer without great Australian barley. Brewing is a vital industry for farmers and the link between barley growers and Australian brewing is stronger than ever.”

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Ekonoke secures €4.2 million investment to support sustainable beer production https://langcreekbrewery.com/ekonoke-secures-e4-2-million-investment-to-support-sustainable-beer-production/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/ekonoke-secures-e4-2-million-investment-to-support-sustainable-beer-production/ Spanish start-up Ekonoke has closed a €4.2 million investment round led by agricultural innovation “central” of Corporación Hijos de Rivera, Cosecha of Galicia. The investment is part of Cosecha de Galicia’s commitment to innovation and sustainable regeneration. The round also included Leanox Impact Ventures, a German impact investment fund, and Alazady España, the family office […]]]>

Spanish start-up Ekonoke has closed a €4.2 million investment round led by agricultural innovation central of Corporación Hijos de Rivera, Cosecha of Galicia.

The investment is part of Cosecha de Galicia’s commitment to innovation and sustainable regeneration. The round also included Leanox Impact Ventures, a German impact investment fund, and Alazady España, the family office of Spanish businessman José María Castellano.

A veteran of one of Edible Adventures‘acceleration programs, Ekonoke has developed a unique method of growing hops indoors hydroponically, which she says brings climate resilience and sustainability to a crop threatened by global warming.

A key ingredient in the production of beer, hops bring bitterness and aromas to beers. Production is currently concentrated in a few regions – mainly the United States and Germany – and the growing process usually requires specific climatic conditions, including an abundance of water and light as well as moderate temperatures.

According to Ekoneke, the increase in extreme weather events due to climate change leads to reductions in productivity per hectare of up to 30%.

Ekoneke combines the knowledge of its agronomists, chemists and biotechnologists with the traditional cultivation experience of the Cosecha de Galicia team. The company’s cultivation method does not involve pesticides, herbicides or fungicides and uses only renewable energy, with a water footprint 20 times lower than traditional methods.

Ekonoke plans to build a 1,000 square meter pilot plant in Galicia, before expanding commercially with a 10,000 square meter facility in 2024.

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Texas craft beer production on the rise after 2020 https://langcreekbrewery.com/texas-craft-beer-production-on-the-rise-after-2020/ Mon, 03 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/texas-craft-beer-production-on-the-rise-after-2020/ Data: Brewers Association; Painting: Thomas Oide/Axios Texas craft breweries rebounded in 2021, a promising sign after the pandemic crippled the industry. The state of the beer: Of the state’s 10 largest breweries, seven increased production in 2021 from a year earlier, according to an Axios analysis of data from the Brewers Association. Pinthouse Brewing was […]]]>

Data: Brewers Association; Painting: Thomas Oide/Axios

Texas craft breweries rebounded in 2021, a promising sign after the pandemic crippled the industry.

The state of the beer: Of the state’s 10 largest breweries, seven increased production in 2021 from a year earlier, according to an Axios analysis of data from the Brewers Association.

  • Pinthouse Brewing was the fastest growing craft brewery in the state with a 92% increase in sales.
  • Only one Texas brewery — Spoetzl Brewery — has seen a year-over-year production drop, but the Shiner-based brewery continues to have the highest sales in the state with more than 500,000 barrels of sales last year.
  • The state also saw 12 breweries close and 45 open, according to the data.

The big picture: The country’s craft beer industry grew by 8% in 2021, while the overall market grew by 1%. Texas placed two breweries among the 50 largest in the country.

  • Yes, but: Among the top 10 spots in the state by number of barrels sold, six breweries have yet to meet or surpass their 2019 sales.

Between the lines: The annual data — published for Brewers Association members in the New Brewer newspaper — is the most comprehensive breakdown of the state’s craft beer industry.

To note : Not all Texas craft brewers are represented in the rankings, as some do not submit sales and production data to the Colorado-based Brewers Association, the industry trade group.

  • Our analysis looked at the sales of breweries, brewpubs and pubs, but excluded contract brewers.
  • Also excluded are local breweries that do not meet the definition of independent.

And after: The association’s chief economist, Bart Watson, who compiled the data, told Axios’ John Frank that 2022 is producing mixed results and forecast growth is close to 4% to 5%.

  • Inflation on the cost of raw materials, especially cereals, is hurting industry. The same goes for competition from other alcoholic products, such as canned cocktails and sodas.
  • “At the brewery, sales are stronger and still growing, so that’s a positive,” Watson said during a recent industry briefing, noting a pandemic recovery point.

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The Fiji Times » CO2 shortage affects beer production worldwide, including in Fiji https://langcreekbrewery.com/the-fiji-times-co2-shortage-affects-beer-production-worldwide-including-in-fiji/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 07:30:59 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/the-fiji-times-co2-shortage-affects-beer-production-worldwide-including-in-fiji/ Beer producers around the world have been hit by a shortage of carbon dioxide and Fiji has not escaped a shortage of the key ingredient unscathed. Paradise Beverages said it was “affected” by the low supply of CO2 gas, an essential part of the production of soft drinks including Fiji Bitter and Fiji Gold. Local […]]]>

Beer producers around the world have been hit by a shortage of carbon dioxide and Fiji has not escaped a shortage of the key ingredient unscathed.

Paradise Beverages said it was “affected” by the low supply of CO2 gas, an essential part of the production of soft drinks including Fiji Bitter and Fiji Gold.

Local distributors contacted this newspaper last week, saying they were turned away from Paradise Beverages factories after learning there was a shortage of Fiji Beer and Fiji Gold.

“As with many businesses in Fiji, we are affected by supply chain issues and global uncertainties,” said Paradise Beverages managing director Mike Spencer.

“CO2 is an ingredient that we and other soft drink manufacturers use and there are global supply chain issues that we are all working on.

“We are focused on continuing to produce our much-loved brands including Fiji Gold, Fiji Bitter, Ratu, Joskes Brew with Cola, to name a few.”

Beer makers in the United States and Australia have reported that a CO2 shortage in the global market is affecting production and could last for months.

Paradise Beverages did not provide answers to specific questions about the shutdown of beer production, current beer stock, and when stock would run out if CO2 was not available.

The company also did not specify which beer products were having production issues due to the unavailability of CO2.

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New shortage could affect beer production in Minnesota https://langcreekbrewery.com/new-shortage-could-affect-beer-production-in-minnesota/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 16:27:58 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/new-shortage-could-affect-beer-production-in-minnesota/ Don’t look now, but another supply chain shortage threatens to affect craft beer production here in Minnesota. The words “beer” and “shortage” are two words I *never* want to see together in a sentence, and yet that’s exactly what’s happening, and just as we head into beer season. Oktoberfest! We’ve grown accustomed to seeing strange […]]]>

Don’t look now, but another supply chain shortage threatens to affect craft beer production here in Minnesota.

The words “beer” and “shortage” are two words I *never* want to see together in a sentence, and yet that’s exactly what’s happening, and just as we head into beer season. Oktoberfest!

We’ve grown accustomed to seeing strange shortages over the past couple of years, as pandemic-related shutdowns have caused those dreaded “supply chain issues,” right? But now, a carbon dioxide shortage could threaten to slow or halt craft beer production across the country and here in Minnesota. Wait what?!?

According to food industry site FoodDive, carbon dioxide is something of an unsung hero when brewing beer. The colorless, odorless gas helps beer retain that distinctive foamy head and helps with everything from improving flavor and changing acidity.

Carbon dioxide is a natural gas and a well in the Mississippi that provides much of the southern and southeastern United States’ carbon dioxide supply has recently been contaminated. This, in turn, puts pressure on carbon dioxide suppliers, which could eventually affect beer production across the country.

Fortunately, however, this KARE-11 story quotes Bob Galligan, who is the Director of Government and Industry Relations for the Minnesota Craft Brewers Guild. He says in the story that craft beer production here in the land of 10,000 lakes is unlikely to be affected by the shortage.

Why your mailbox might soon have an orange or yellow sticker on it here in MN

That’s because most of the carbon dioxide used by Minnesota brewers doesn’t come from Mississippi, but rather from North Star State ethanol producers who capture “drink-grade” carbon dioxide and supply to several states here in the Midwest.

Phew! Yet this is just another problem local craft brewers will now have to contend with, having already faced other pandemic-related dilemmas, such as a shortage of aluminum cans and rising prices of other ingredients.

Speaking of beer, if you’re a beer fan, you don’t want to miss this year’s Rochester On Tap, taking place Saturday, October 15 at the Mayo Civic Center. Get more information and get your tickets HERE. And keep scrolling to discover amazing local breweries within an hour of Rochester!

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Weekdays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Quick Country 96.5

Delicious beers await at these 22 breweries less than an hour from Rochester

Craft breweries are incredibly popular right now and it doesn’t look like they’re going anywhere. Here in southeast Minnesota, there are 22 breweries all within an hour of Rochester and more are being added!

7 Wisconsin Breweries Every Beer Lover Should Visit

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UK beer production threatened by soaring CO2 prices https://langcreekbrewery.com/uk-beer-production-threatened-by-soaring-co2-prices/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 19:41:15 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/uk-beer-production-threatened-by-soaring-co2-prices/ Beer production in the UK has suffered a terrible blow from exorbitant CO2 prices and is now in danger of coming to a complete halt. Global warming gas prices have increased tenfold, for several reasons, including the transportation of COVID-19 vaccines in 2021 which required large amounts of frozen carbon dioxide, better known as dry […]]]>

Beer production in the UK has suffered a terrible blow from exorbitant CO2 prices and is now in danger of coming to a complete halt.

Global warming gas prices have increased tenfold, for several reasons, including the transportation of COVID-19 vaccines in 2021 which required large amounts of frozen carbon dioxide, better known as dry ice.

Right now, the entire food and beverage industry is facing a shortage of carbon dioxide, but brewers are particularly hard hit, as CO2 is used in a whole range of steps in the beer-making process. , from carbonation to packaging.

Warnings have been issued by suppliers about supply chain disruptions that could halt beer production just before the crucial holiday season.

Last month, US fertilizer group CF Industries also warned it would close its UK ammonia plant, responsible for producing around a third of the country’s CO2 supply, in response to soaring natural gas prices.

Pertinent: UK food and drink market threatened by CO2 supply shortage

A further 40% of the UK’s CO2 supply is produced by Ensus, which has also temporarily closed its bioethanol plant in Teesside.

Just three months ago, in June, UK brewers were paying an average of £250 (~$285) per metric tonne of CO2. Last week, the price peaked at £2,800 (~$3,200) per ton.

The incredible price hike mainly affects small brewers and regional brewers, as multinational brewers tend to be equipped with carbon capture systems that allow them to capture their own emissions.

For local and craft beer makers in the UK, on ​​the other hand, this technology is still far too expensive and they are dependent on CO2 wholesalers.

Read more: Beer shortage on the horizon due to lack of CO2

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GEA unveils water-saving technology for non-alcoholic beer production https://langcreekbrewery.com/gea-unveils-water-saving-technology-for-non-alcoholic-beer-production/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 09:57:58 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/gea-unveils-water-saving-technology-for-non-alcoholic-beer-production/ Sep 07, 2022 — A technical solution to reduce fresh water consumption in non-alcoholic beer production processes will save up to 66% to 100% water. This, according to GEA, is an important step towards freshwater neutrality in production processes and will solve the problem of limited availability of deoxygenated water that many […]]]>




Sep 07, 2022 — A technical solution to reduce fresh water consumption in non-alcoholic beer production processes will save up to 66% to 100% water. This, according to GEA, is an important step towards freshwater neutrality in production processes and will solve the problem of limited availability of deoxygenated water that many breweries face.

Filtration technology uses special polymer membranes to separate alcohol and water from other ingredients, saving water.

Reverse osmosis technology allows for a cleaner separation of water and alcohol from the “crucial” ingredients that give beer aroma, color and turbidity.

“Our latest filtration system combines the trend towards 0.0% beer with the goal of reducing water consumption in production,” explains Ralf Scheibner, filtration expert at GEA.

Tapping into by-products
The company reports that the system not only saves fresh water, but also uses the remaining alcohol (from dealcoholization or diafiltration) as a valuable by-product.

“Due to its lower volume, it has a higher alcohol content and can thus be used as a base for alcoholic mixed drinks and trendy drinks, such as seltzer water, or can be reused. Filtration technology uses special polymer membranes to separate alcohol and water from other ingredients. within the brewery itself”, explains the company.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that breweries whose production facilities offered the flexibility to process other beverages have coped better with falling demand,” Scheibner points out.

Originally designed for the dealcoholization of beer down to 0%, the system is also used for other non-alcoholic beverages, such as cider at 0%.

GEA explains how the growing demand for non-alcoholic beer “was a beacon of hope in the pandemic period of low sales”, as new buyers replaced some of the lost consumers.

Pressure not heat
The specially developed reverse osmosis membrane is highly selective for ethanol, allowing brewers to filter alcohol at lower temperatures. This saves time, saves energy and preserves flavor – allowing breweries to skip the step of restoring flavor after alcohol removal.

“Membrane filtration is now on the fast track as the gentlest dealcoholization technology,” the company points out. The technology focuses on pressure, not heat, when filtering alcohol.

Boon without alcohol
Avoiding and reducing alcohol is quickly becoming the norm for a growing minority of global consumers. While this trend is seen across all age groups, it’s most evident among Gen Z drinkers, with up to a third of drinkers between the ages of 18 and 25 reporting never consuming alcohol, according to a new report from Innova Market Insights.

This trend is reflected in the business activities of international beer brewers, such as Kirin Holdings, which expects to reach 209.5 million sold cases of soft drinks in 2022, a 2% increase year-on-year. last.

Companies are also racing towards carbon-neutral non-alcoholic beer. With Australian beer brand XXXX eyeing 2025 as the year it will use 100% renewable electricity in its manufacturing.

Governments might not be as pleased as corporations with the 0.0% increase in alcohol consumption, as countries like Japan see significantly lower revenues from liquor taxes.

By Marc Cervera

To contact our editorial team, please email us at Editorial@cnsmedia.com

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‘Desperate times’: Northampton brewery reacts to 62% rise in beer production prices https://langcreekbrewery.com/desperate-times-northampton-brewery-reacts-to-62-rise-in-beer-production-prices/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 13:38:00 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/desperate-times-northampton-brewery-reacts-to-62-rise-in-beer-production-prices/ A Northampton brewery has responded to the 62% increase in the cost of producing beer. Alaric Neville, managing director of Phipps NBC Brewery, says the industry is going through “desperate times”. This follows eToro’s Beer Index revealing that producing, packaging and transporting beer has soared by just under two-thirds of total costs since August 2020. […]]]>

A Northampton brewery has responded to the 62% increase in the cost of producing beer.

Alaric Neville, managing director of Phipps NBC Brewery, says the industry is going through “desperate times”.

This follows eToro’s Beer Index revealing that producing, packaging and transporting beer has soared by just under two-thirds of total costs since August 2020.

Managing director of Phipps NBC brewery says as a medium-sized company, rising petrol prices have the biggest impact on Phipps NBC – as well as the cost of diesel when they deliver beer in the East Midlands.

The beer index looked at spot prices for raw materials needed by beer producers, such as barley and malt, as well as aluminum and gasoline needed for packaging and transportation.

Alaric says that as a medium-sized business, the increase in petrol prices has the biggest impact on Phipps NBC – as well as the cost of diesel when they deliver beer to East Midlands sites .

The chief executive said: “I wonder when the time will come when people will stop buying beer because it’s not an essential part of many people’s lives – but it would also be one of the last things some people would give up.

“We are doing well as a business and feel like we’ve bounced back from the pandemic, and it’s frustrating to be faced with this challenge now.

“I’ve been in the business since 2008 and I’ve never seen anything like these price increases before.”

Phipps NBC has done its best to keep staff salaries in line with the rate of inflation, and they were last increased by 5% in April.

“We are not ready to let our staff suffer the consequences of rising costs,” said Alaric.

Phipps NBC had to subsidize the impact of the wage increase, because customers will stop buying the products if the prices rise too much.

The fluctuation of stock prices also poses problems for the company. Where prices were previously held for a year and then reduced to six months, they are now only for three months – because it depends on what suppliers and energy companies want to charge.

What new Prime Minister Liz Truss does next will be crucial for the beer industry, and Alaric believes the fate of its future is in his hands – as well as what happens in Ukraine.

He thinks the government’s priority is the consumer and businesses, especially small independents, tend to get left behind.

Alaric asked: “Does the government no longer want this industry to be part of British society?

“If this continues, independent businesses will be the first to close and the market will continue to crash.”

It also comes from the fact that high levels of taxes are added to beer and alcohol, with around a third of the cost of a pint being tax.

Alaric has seen businesses that have survived everything else shut down due to the problems that current price increases have caused.

He says ‘it’s sad to see decent local bars and pubs closed whether they stock Phipps or not’ and they’re ‘crying because every loss impacts the industry’.

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Bitter to swallow: Cost of beer production skyrockets 62% in two years, heralding ‘drink inflation’ https://langcreekbrewery.com/bitter-to-swallow-cost-of-beer-production-skyrockets-62-in-two-years-heralding-drink-inflation/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 12:24:21 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/bitter-to-swallow-cost-of-beer-production-skyrockets-62-in-two-years-heralding-drink-inflation/ The cost of raw materials needed to produce, package and transport beer has increased by 62% over the past two years, according to the very first beer index of the social investment platform eToro. The rate of price growth significantly exceeds the nearly 17.3% rise in the Romanian Consumer Price Index (CPI) over the same […]]]>

The cost of raw materials needed to produce, package and transport beer has increased by 62% over the past two years, according to the very first beer index of the social investment platform eToro.

The rate of price growth significantly exceeds the nearly 17.3% rise in the Romanian Consumer Price Index (CPI) over the same period, indicating that beer drinkers are likely to will face pricing difficulties as brewers look for ways to offset their costs. .

eToro’s “Beer Index” (simple weighted index) is based on the current spot prices of a basket of six commodities needed to produce and sell beer: wheat, barley, rice, malt, aluminum (for cans) and fuel (for transport and agriculture). . Since August 20, 2020, the beer index has risen 62%, with the war in Ukraine playing a significant role in the costs brewers are currently facing.

Bogdan Maioreanu, Market Analyst at eToro, said: “In Romania, the increase in the price of beer was lower than the overall increase in inflation. But our beer index tells us stronger cost pressures are brewing and bigger price increases could be on the horizon. It could be an unfortunate time with the domestic football championship on the way and the World Cup kicking off in November.

In Romania, according to the INS, the increase in beer prices has been more moderate than inflation. In July 2021, the price of beer increased by 2.54% compared to July 2020 and by an additional 8.02% in July 2022 compared to the same month of 2021.

Fuel – needed to grow beer ingredients as well as transport the product – saw the biggest price increase of any item in the beer basket, its cost jumping 138%, largely thanks to to the war in Ukraine and the restriction of crude oil supplies from Russia.

Barley and malt prices have also soared, increasing by 104% and 87% respectively over the same period, also largely due to the disruption caused by the war, with Russia and Ukraine supplying up to to 30% of world barley exports.

Rice is the only beer index commodity to have fallen in price over the past two years, down 1% since mid-August 2020. The stable price of the crop – which is used as supplement in combination with barley malt to lighten beer – reportedly declining to supply more than demand each year since 2007, leading to large stocks.

Commodity Base = 100

(August 20, 2020)

Price indexed

(August 19, 2021)

Price indexed

(August 18, 2022)

Barley 100 157 204
Aluminum 100 146 137
Gasoline 100 179 238
Rice 100 97 99
Wheat 100 128 139
Malt 100 128 187
eToro Beer Index 100 134 162

Spot prices collected on the third Thursday of August each year. Equal weighting between the six products.

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EU beer production still below pre-pandemic level https://langcreekbrewery.com/eu-beer-production-still-below-pre-pandemic-level/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 09:23:58 +0000 https://langcreekbrewery.com/eu-beer-production-still-below-pre-pandemic-level/ Recently released data showed that more than half of the beer produced in the European Union is made in just four countries, but despite year-on-year growth, last year’s production was still below the 2019 level. The data, released by the European Commission’s statistical office Eurostat, shows EU member states produced 33.1 billion liters of alcoholic […]]]>

Recently released data showed that more than half of the beer produced in the European Union is made in just four countries, but despite year-on-year growth, last year’s production was still below the 2019 level.

The data, released by the European Commission’s statistical office Eurostat, shows EU member states produced 33.1 billion liters of alcoholic beer in 2021, up from just under 32 billion liters in 2020.

Also noteworthy was the increase in the production of non-alcoholic beer options, which increased by almost 20% compared to the level of 2019 to reach 1.7 billion liters. In total, it is estimated that last year’s production would provide 78 liters of beer for every inhabitant of the EU.

The overall increase is still below pre-pandemic levels. Between 2019 and 2020, alcoholic beer production in the EU fell by 8%, from 34 billion l.

As for the EU countries that produce the largest share, Germany is responsible for 23% of all beer, Poland and Spain were responsible for 11% each, and the Netherlands for 7 %. These are the exact levels for 2019, suggesting that the pandemic has not materially changed the geographical distribution of brewing in the EU. Before Brexit, the UK was actually the second largest beer producer in the EU.

The Netherlands, home of Heineken and Amstel, also remains the EU’s biggest beer exporter, selling 1.9 billion liters of alcoholic beer abroad (representing more than a fifth of total EU exports). EU beer last year). Belgium and Germany were in second and third place respectively.

The leading importer of alcoholic beer produced in the EU within the Union itself is France, which imports 0.8 billion l. 22% of all extra-EU beer exports went to the UK last year, a volume of 0.9 billion liters (a slight increase from the 0.83 billion liters exported to the UK United in 2019). The second largest non-EU market was the United States, which accounted for 19% of extra-EU beer exports in 2021.

Perhaps most strikingly, after Brexit, 47% of extra-EU imports of alcoholic beer came from the UK (0.25bnl) – the same proportion as in 2019. It should be noted that although the UK did not leave the EU until 2020, it was excluded from the 2019 data.

Last year, Mexico was the second largest supplier of extra-EU alcoholic beer, with 0.12 billion l of Mexican beer imported in 2021.

To find out how EU countries compare to the rest of the world when it comes to beer production, click here.

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